Skip navigation

Transcriptions

I’ve just finished transcribing an hour long interview. It took ages to do and my eyes and hands hurt. One down, 20-odd more to go. It’s a shame because the interview part is actually pretty good fun, it’s just the typing everything after that is the pain in the arse.

One day machines will do this.

Aside:
Florida Voting Machine

Advertisements

5 Comments

  1. Well, what my supervisors told me is that transcription is ‘good for you’ – that is, you end up learning more about the interview as you transcribe because you are listening intently. But it’s certainly a slog!

    David

  2. Well, what my supervisors told me is that transcription is ‘good for you’ – that is, you end up learning more about the interview as you transcribe because you are listening intently. But it’s certainly a slog!

    David

  3. I would agree with previous comment – you do get a better feel for the data, and it’s surprising how many important things you forget were mentioned, even a day or so afterwards!

    One idea which may, or may not, help – if you produce a set interview script and a set of generic prompts like “can you explain a bit more” etc, and (and this is the tricky bit) try and stick to it as closely as possible you may be able to reduce the transcription time by pre-preparing a generic one sided interview transcript with the basic questions and cut and paste from the list of prompts. Then all you have to do is check your wording of the questions as you go through and type in the responses. It may also help you to stick to the same wording to ensure each interviewee is asked the same question, not a subtly different one due to slight rewording… ? Just an idea…

  4. Just a suggestion which may or may not help. Have you considered producing a script for the interview, with set of generic prompts? if so then as long as you can stick to it you have effectively halved the transcription time coz you already know pretty much what you are going to say and can pre-type a template interview transcript, one sided of course. Also, it can help maintain consistency between interviews, as you are more likely to try and keep wording the questions exactly the same to a) cut down on extra typing and b) ensure all interviewees are answering exactly the same question, not a subtly different one because of rewording…
    There would, of course, always be some editing needed but the closer you stick to the exact words the better for transcription and for consistency sake?

  5. Thanks for the advice! It is a slog, but I guess the whole “transcription is good for you” is spot on – does help me to get a better idea of the data. Still, I prefer the age-old adage – “Guinness is good for you”.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: